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The DIRT on AP - a winery blog

Ancient Peaks
 
January 18, 2018 | Ancient Peaks

The Art of Blending

Our winemakers recently stepped up to answer an age-old philosophical question: "Blending wines – is it art, science or a little of both?"

Indeed, Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor and Winemaker Stewart Cameron fielded this question as part of the new "Ask The Expert" series on the popular Reverse Wine Snob site. 

So what's their answer? "A lot of both."

They continue: "To be good at blending wines, you have to know your science. But to be great, you need to bring some artistry to the task.

Let’s start with the science – the chemistry of the wine. Much of this is handled at harvest time, by growing, fermenting and then aging wines that are technically sound. Your tannins, acids, pH and alcohols are established early in the life of a wine, so that is your time to get it right. You want to avoid scientific flaws, rather than try to fix or blend them away later.

However, science can only take you so far. If you are driven to achieve something great – a blend that will stand the test of time – then you need to delve into the art and mysticism of wine. You need to push and challenge yourself as a winemaker, to taste the wines of the world as your point of reference, then create something that is truly your own."

Click here to read the rest of the story on Reverse Wine Snob. 

Time Posted: Jan 18, 2018 at 2:19 PM
Ancient Peaks
 
January 15, 2018 | Ancient Peaks

Ancient Peaks: The Movie

Okay, it’s not quite a full-length movie, but it covers a lot of ground!

Indeed, we are excited to share our new three-minute winery video titled “The Ancient Peaks Winery Experience."

Shot by the talented Cameron Ingalls, this video shows how our three longtime local winegrowing and ranching families have built Ancient Peaks upon a legacy of history, hospitality and family. We hope you enjoy watching this latest chapter in the Ancient Peaks story.  

Time Posted: Jan 15, 2018 at 2:05 PM
Ancient Peaks
 
October 31, 2017 | Ancient Peaks

2017 Vintage Report: A Return to "Normal"


Sometimes “normal” is a good thing!

Indeed, after a wet winter and spring, the 2017 harvest signaled a return to the pre-drought days at Margarita Vineyard, with a long growing season once again stretching into November for late-ripening varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon. This is, in a word, normal for us.

“We cruised right along at what you might call a typical pace this year, if you’re looking at it from a 10-year perspective,” says Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor. “When things were really dry in recent years, we were picking our early-ripening varieties starting in August. This year, our harvest began September, which is how it typically was at Margarita Vineyard before the drought really kicked in.” 

People often remark about how our wines exhibit a unique balance of full flavors with structure and acidity—and these qualities are a direct reflection of our long growing season and later harvests at Margarita Vineyard. And this year will be no different.

“I like what I am seeing and tasting in the fruit this year,” says Winemaker Stewart Cameron. “We are getting the ripe flavors we want, but with really nice structure as well.”

Time Posted: Oct 31, 2017 at 11:22 AM
Ancient Peaks
 
January 12, 2017 | Ancient Peaks

Whole Cluster Magic


Tannin management is one of the priorities of Winemaker Stewart Cameron here at Ancient Peaks, where we are frankly obsessed with creating balanced wines with firm—but not astringent—structure.

A perfect example is the 2014 Syrah “Jackpot” from our estate Margarita Vineyard, which will be first shared with wine club members in February, and in our tasting room shortly thereafter.

Unlike more naturally tannic varieties such as Petit Sirah, Petit Verdot and even Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah can often need encouragement to raise the tannin profile.

Therefore, on half of the 2014 Syrah, Stewart employed “whole-cluster” fermentation, whereby the stems are included in the fermentation bins, ultimately enhancing the tannin presence. “Whole-cluster fermentation gives you more savory characteristics and more complexity, along with a tannin bump that affects the perceived dryness of the wine,” Stewart says.

Whole-cluster fermentation, however, is very labor intensive and has its own pitfalls if not managed properly. For the 2014 Syrah, for example, the whole-cluster portion was done on a later pick with riper fruit. “You don’t want the tannins you pick up from the stems to taste young and green, which is why we waited to do the whole-cluster portion on the riper fruit,” he says.

The end result is a Syrah that is loaded with rich, velvety dark fruit flavors—but it also exhibits noticeable backbone that takes it to another level.

Stewart says that his approach to Syrah is inspired by the wines of Cornas in the northern Rhône Valley, where whole-cluster fermentation is part of the local winemaking tradition.

“There are a lot of California Rhône-style wines that are really pleasurable in a softer, fruit-driven way,” Stewart says. “We want our Syrah to exhibit some of those qualities, but we’re also aiming for something with added complexity and the ability to age well.”

Keep an eye out for this Syrah soon in our Paso Robles tasting room, which is also a place to eat in the Paso Robles wine country at the adjoining Ancient Peaks Café.

Time Posted: Jan 12, 2017 at 4:05 PM
Ancient Peaks
 
September 6, 2015 | Ancient Peaks

Picture Perfect


They say that a picture is worth a thousand words, and here is a perfect example—a photo taken the other day of coastal fog clutching the peaks of the Santa Lucia mountains in Santa Margarita on an otherwise sunny morning above the Cuesta Grade.

We often talk about the climate of our estate Margarita Vineyard here, because we are on the dividing line between the warmer inland environs to the north and the cooler coastal region south of the grade. 

As such, our climate is a bit of a hybrid that is vividly captured in this photo—a borderland of sun and fog, situated in the mountains but only 14 miles from the beach.

Of course, this can’t help but have a significant impact on our fruit and ultimately the character of our wines.

Indeed, this consistent cooling effect creates a long growing season with later harvest dates. We are still able to fully ripen signature Paso Robles varieties such as Zinfandel, Cabernet and Merlot, but in a manner that maintains a signature structure and balance that are rooted in the climate. You can taste it, and sometimes you can even see it on a September morning like the one pictured here.  

Time Posted: Sep 6, 2015 at 10:46 AM
Ancient Peaks
 
June 23, 2015 | Ancient Peaks

Going with The Grain

On certain wines, such as our Petit Verdot, we make note of aging the wine in “tightly grained” oak barrels, which may raise the question: why does oak grain matter? Let us explain…

The notion of tightly grained wood is fairly self evident. Most woods, including oak, come in different grains, depending on the species and where they are grown. Some are more widely grained, others are more tightly packed.

Now, in the wine aging process, wide-grained oak tends to produce a wine that has a more pronounced oak and wood tannin character. In other words, if you want your wine to taste more oaky, or if you have a powerful wine that needs a more assertive oak balance, you might veer toward wide-grained oak.

On the flipside, tight-grained wood is more restrained in its influence. So if you want the oak character of the wine to be more subtle, then you will choose tight-grained oak for aging.

One example is our aforementioned Petit Verdot. In the words of Winemaker Stewart Cameron, “Petit Verdot has some unique varietal flavor profiles that no other Bordeaux varieties have, and we want to keep those at the forefront of the wine. We don’t want it to taste like French oak, so we choose wood with a tight grain and lighter toasting to produce a wine that is varietally true.”

On a more powerful wine, however, such as our Petite Sirah, Stewart might loosen the reins on the grain to ensure that the oak influence is sufficiently present.

And therein lies the significance of oak grain. Ultimately, it’s just one of many arrows in the winemaker’s quiver for guiding the style of a given wine. 

Time Posted: Jun 23, 2015 at 2:44 PM
Ancient Peaks
 
February 25, 2015 | Ancient Peaks

The Ballet of Bottling


In the world of wine, it’s easy to take the act of bottling for granted. Everyone likes to see vineyards and barrels, and to taste the finished product. But who goes out of their way to think about bottling?

Yet for those willing to take a closer look, bottling is, in fact, a fascinating ballet of moving parts. As we get set to bottle our 2014 Sauvignon Blanc, here’s a breakdown of what it takes:

First, cases of empty bottles are emptied onto a conveyer. From there, each bottle is sparged with inert nitrogen gas. Since nitrogen is heavier than air, it displaces any oxygen in the bottle.

Next, each bottle is filled along a wheel of 18 individual nozzles for simultaneous and continuous filling. At full speed, it can fill up to 60 bottles per minute, or one every second. And remember that nitrogen? Since it displaced the air from the bottles, the wine doesn’t come into contact with any potentially problematic oxygen as it fills the bottle.

At this point, the process for our Sauvignon Blanc and other screw-capped wines deviates from our corked wines. As the filled Sauvignon Blanc bottles continue down the conveyer, a laser detects each bottle, triggering a drop of liquid nitrogen into the top of the bottle, where it immediately turns into inert gas. That last drop of nitrogen is crucial, because screw-capped bottles have larger head space in the neck compared to corked bottles. The gas ensures an air-free environment to keep the wine fresh and vibrant.

Next, a screw cap is applied, and then crimped onto the bottle. From there, the bottles are labeled under the watchful eyes of quality control staff, who remove any bottles with crooked labels or other defects.

When things are really humming at 60 bottles per minute, our mobile bottling line can produce up to 300 cases per hour. So while bottling may not be the sexiest part of winemaking, it’s certainly action packed, and it’s the final step on the wine’s journey from ground to glass.

Ancient Peaks
 
December 22, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

A Wine Not Made

Sometimes you’re defined not just by the wines you make, but by the wines you don’t.

A case in point is our 2011 Petit Verdot, or more specifically, what might have been our 2011 Petit Verdot.

Petit Verdot has been a mainstay of our White Label reserve series for many years, along with Malbec, Petite Sirah and the Oyster Ridge red blend. But in 2011, the Petit Verdot just didn’t measure up to our White Label standards, so we didn’t bottle it.

“Petit Verdot is always the last grape to ripen at Margarita Vineyard,” says Mike Sinor, our director of winemaking. “We had a cool year in 2011, and the Petit Verdot fruit just never developed the intensity we were looking for at the White Label level. It was close, but in the end, we decided not to bottle it.”

He adds, “It was hard. That wine has a fan base, and we were walking away from revenue. But one reason it has that fan base is because of the White Label standard of quality that we’ve set.”

Such decisions are part of a larger culture here at Ancient Peaks, where ownership and staff routinely taste our wines together and push each other for honest feedback (one such tasting pictured above!). As Mike says, “You can get so caught up in cutting wood that you forget to sharpen your saw. It’s easy to lose sight of that when things get busy, but we’ve made it a priority here to set aside time for gut-checking ourselves.”

We also conduct comparative tastings of different varietals and wine regions from the U.S. and beyond. “It’s easy to develop what we call a ‘house palate,’ where you become too focused on your own wines,” Mike says. “It’s critical to have more of a global view of wine, and to understand where you fit into it.”

So there you have it—the true story behind a wine that we didn’t make.  

Ancient Peaks
 
November 21, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

"Painting" the 2012 Zinfandel

We often talk about the diverse soils and complex geography of our estate Margarita Vineyard, which spans a variety of different slopes, aspects and elevations. 

If you’re inclined to ask, “Why does it matter?”, we’ll forgive you—and then pour you a glass of our 2012 Zinfandel, which is a perfect example of why it matters.

As Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor explains in the short video above, the 2012 Zinfandel is a blend of three separate blocks grown in three distinct soil types at Margarita Vineyard.

Fruit from the volcanic soils of Block 32 brings a core of varietal spiciness to the wine, while a contribution from the shale soils of Block 49 adds a layer of dark, ripe fruit. Lastly, the cooler climes and alluvial soils of Block 39 bring enhanced structure and backbone.  

The nuance doesn’t end there. As Mike explains, he and Winemaker Stewart Cameron target specific subsections, which you might call “blocks within blocks.” So from Block 32, they choose fruit from the middle of the block, which they call the tenderloin. In Block 49, they focus on the elevated crown of the block. In other words, a slight change in aspect or elevation can be the difference between good and great.

The result is that Mike and Stewart have what they call “different colors to paint with” when assembling the final blend. It allows them to craft an estate-grown wine that naturally exhibits fullness and complexity, qualities that you can taste in our 2012 Zinfandel. 

Ancient Peaks
 
October 15, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

A Singular AVA

Big news is breaking here in the Paso Robles wine country, and it’s really big news for Ancient Peaks Winery.

Last week, the U.S. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) issued a final ruling creating 11 new American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) within the Paso Robles region: Adelaida District, Creston District, El Pomar District, Paso Robles Estrella District, Paso Robles Geneseo District, Paso Robles Highlands District, Paso Robles Willow Creek District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Templeton Gap District…and Santa Margarita Ranch.

Of course, the last one, Santa Margarita Ranch, is home to our estate Margarita Vineyard—which now becomes by far the most predominant vineyard within the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA boundaries.  

We’ve long talked about the uniqueness of Margarita Vineyard as the southernmost vineyard in the Paso Robles region, standing alone and apart just 14 miles from the Pacific Ocean. This new recognition of Santa Margarita Ranch as its own distinct AVA confirms what we’ve been saying all along, and we’re very excited about it. 

In the words of the TTB, an AVA designation “allows vintners and consumers to attribute a given quality, reputation, or other characteristic of a wine made from grapes grown in an area to its geographic origin.” AVA designations are not taken lightly. They must be petitioned, and their unique growing conditions must be proven. 

As the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA petition stated, “The Santa Margarita ‘valley’ has a distinctive maritime and mountain-valley climate within the large Paso Robles AVA, different than the other proposed viticultural areas… The region is very much a true, cool Region II climate.”

We will be drilling deeper into this topic and the special attributes of the new Santa Margarita Ranch AVA. Stay tuned…  

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