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The DIRT on AP - a winery blog

Ancient Peaks
 
April 19, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Road Trippin'

We strive to offer a remarkable wine club, and that mission is aided by the fact that we have some amazing wine club members.

This was never more evident than at a recent wine club “road trip” tasting event that we hosted at Bacchus Bar & Bistro in Irvine, California.  This event was designed as a complimentary “thank you” to our club members who reside in Southern California.

We weren’t sure how many members would make it. It’s not like they all live right around Irvine. Plus, many people are busy with work and family obligations. 

“We thought if we could get 30 or 40 people that would be great,” says Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor, who co-hosted the event. “So we were blown away when 70 members showed up.”

Yes, that’s right—70 wine club members came to an event located 240 miles from our winery! How cool is that? 

“Their enthusiasm was infectious,” Mike says. “They were really into it, and it was a great time for all of us. This kind of turnout really says a lot about our members.”

We offer an array of ongoing benefits and events for club members, as well as occasional surprise events like this one. Stay tuned for more, and join the fun if you haven’t already. 

P.S. Here’s a short recap video of our “Reds, Whites & Greens” container gardening demo that we hosted for club members last week:

Ancient Peaks
 
April 11, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

On The Rise in Paso Robles


We are pleased to share that our winemaker, Stewart Cameron, is featured as one of five “up-and-coming” Paso Robles winemakers in the new issue of The Tasting Panel Magazine.
 

In the story, wine authority Christopher Sawyer “gives a shout-out to the winemakers to watch in California’s most dynamic AVA.”
 
Sawyer writes, “Since joining the winemaking team at Ancient Peaks in 2006, Stewart Cameron has mastered the art of interweaving the personality of the vineyard into the special estate cuvée called Oyster Ridge.”
 
Oyster Ridge is a red blend crafted each year to exemplify our finest winemaking efforts. The name Oyster Ridge honors a block of fossilized ancient sea bed at our estate Margarita Vineyard, which exhibits the type of calcium-rich soil that is coveted by winemakers worldwide.
 
You may recall that Stewart was promoted to the position of winemaker last summer. At the time, Ancient Peaks co-owner Doug Filipponi stated, “Stewart has a knack for making wines that really capture Margarita Vineyard’s sense of place.” That’s something that Mr. Sawyer has clearly noted as well. 
 
The story also notes that Oyster Ridge pairs well with elk medallions, Stewart’s favorite dish at The Range restaurant here in Santa Margarita!

 

Time Posted: Apr 11, 2014 at 9:30 AM
Ancient Peaks
 
April 8, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

It's On: Bud Break 2014

The following post is copied from Ancient Peaks co-owner and viticulturist Doug Filipponi's contribution to the Paso Robles Grower Blog. Click here to check out this regional blog and to keep up with the growing season across Paso Robles. 

The 2014 vintage is officially underway in our estate Margarita Vineyard and across the Paso Robles region with the recent advent of “bud break,” the process whereby the buds on the vines open up and burst forth with fresh green growth.

Vines that looked dormant and skeletal just a few weeks ago now look very much alive, and the growing season is upon us. As we head into April, the new growth is taking shape as spindly shoots, small leaves and tiny flowers. Later this spring, the flowers will self-pollinate and set the crop for the 2014 vintage.

This year, bud break has arrived about a week earlier than average, due to a dry and relatively warm winter, as well as picture-perfect spring weather in mid-March with temperatures reaching the mid-80s for a few days. In other words, there was nothing holding the vines back from getting the show on the road.

As always, the priority right now is to protect the delicate new growth from frost damage. As you may know, Paso Robles is blessed with beneficial “diurnal” temperature swings. Temperature differences of 40 and even 50 degrees are not uncommon within a 24-hour period during the heart of the growing season. The warm days enable the fruit to develop rich, ripe flavors, while the cool nights help maintain balance and structure – all hallmarks of the wines of Paso Robles.
In the spring, however, those temperature swings can take us all the way below freezing by morning time – and once the mercury dips below 32-degrees, it can spell trouble in the vineyard. If left unchecked, frost can throttle the new growth and the vine will lose its new leaves and flowers.

Therefore, vineyard crews must be alert and vigilant whenever there’s a chance of frost – and they must act quickly to turn on the frost control systems when necessary. At Margarita Vineyard, we have five weather stations to warn us of low temperatures throughout the vineyard. We use targeted pulsator sprinklers during frost events. These pulsator sprinklers are trained on the cordons, coating the vine with a fine spray. The water freezes around the new growth and creates a protective barrier from outside temperatures that dip below 32 degrees. When ice is forming, it creates heat. It also creates heat when it’s melting. So yes, ironically, we use ice to protect the vines from frost damage!

Mother Nature has done her job once again, and the vines are fully awakened. It’s now our job to protect what we have been given. Looking forward, we are bullish on the 2014 vintage in Paso Robles. There’s still a ways to go, but we are off to a good start.

Ancient Peaks
 
March 20, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Brewing Up Sustainability

At our estate Margarita Vineyard, sustainability isn’t just a buzzword—it’s a true force of resource conservation with positive benefits to both the vineyard environment and the resulting wines.
 
With the new growing season about to get rolling with spring bud break, one of our most effective sustainable practices is set to play a role in the 2014 vintage.
 
This would be “compost tea,” a liquefied natural compost fertilizer that is delivered right to the root zone of the vines via our drip irrigation lines. The use of compost tea has drastically cut our use of synthetic fertilizers, creating a more balanced soil composition and providing wholesome nutrients to the vines.
 
We “brew” our compost tea mainly from “vermicompost,” a fancy name for worm castings. We cultivate worm beds on site specifically for creating compost tea. The brewing cycle is 24 hours. The brew can include brewer’s yeast, kelp and molasses to help grow the mix of beneficial bacteria and fungi. Once brewed, the tea is ready for delivery to the vines.
 
For the vines, it’s like eating green vegetables (compost tea) compared to simply taking a multivitamin (traditional fertilizers). The uptake of nutrients is more complete, natural and thorough. It also avoids the nitrate soil buildup that can occur with traditional fertilizers.
 
The result is a more balanced vine that allows us to maximize fruit quality. Additionally, we maintain a healthier soil profile that is better for the vineyard environment and the creatures (and people) who inhabit it.
 

Ancient Peaks
 
March 12, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

The Road to Bud Break

Even though we finally had some late rains this winter, we are still expecting an early “bud break.”

Indeed, as of today, we are expecting bud break to begin about 10 days earlier than average at our estate Margarita Vineyard, which means it should be coming very soon. 

Bud break occurs when the vine buds open and push the first green growth of the vintage. It’s the moment when the vines truly awaken from dormancy and inaugurate the growing season. 

The dry, relatively warm winter of 2014 means that the vines have been encouraged to awaken sooner rather than later, hence the expected early bud break.

During bud break, the buds open to reveal thin shoots, small leaves and tiny flowers that, in the months ahead, will become long canes, large leaves and juicy grape clusters. 

The young growth is delicate and vulnerable to frost. And with bud breaking coming early this year, it means that this new growth will be exposed to a longer window of potential frost events.

In the short video above, Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor and Vineyard Manager Jaime Muniz talk about the road to bud break. Stay tuned for updates from the vineyard!  
 

Ancient Peaks
 
February 28, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Good Tidings Ahead

Things are looking up as we round the corner into March.

First, some significant rainfall this week is bringing much-needed water to the Central Coast. Yesterday’s storm brought more than two inches to our estate Margarita Vineyard, and the meteorologists say there’s more to come over the next few days.

Also, we are staging two March events—one for the public, the other for our wine club members—that will tantalize your taste buds:

Paso Robles Zinfandel Festival – March 14-16

Get your Zin on as we go all out during the Paso Robles Zinfandel Festival weekend! On both days, we will serve complimentary made-to-order artisan grilled cheese sandwiches from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. We are also offering complimentary tours of our estate Margarita Vineyard, with a focus on the diverse soils and marine moderated climate that enable us to craft one of the Paso Robles region’s most acclaimed Zinfandels. These Paso Robles vineyard tours are available by appointment on Friday at 3 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. To RSVP for a tour, call us at (805) 365-7045. And for more on the festival and related activities across the region, visit PasoWine.com.

Wine Club Artisan Cheese Seminar – March 20 (the first official day of spring!)

Wine club members are invited to join us at our tasting room on Thursday, March 20 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. as we team up with Fromagerie Sophie to explore the art of wine and cheese pairing. Based in San Luis Obispo, Fromagerie Sophie is the Central Coast’s newest artisan “cheesemonger.” Proprietor Sophie Boban-Doering brings a French-inspired flair to her regional cheese offerings, and she will provide a tasty demonstration on how to find the perfect match for a variety of wine styles. The cost is $15 for A-List members and $10 for Six Shooters, inclusive of wine, cheese and good cheer. 

Not a wine club member? Please check out our member lounge to see the array of events and benefits that we offer to members.

Ancient Peaks
 
February 24, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Digging into Soil Differences

Our estate Margarita Vineyard is blessed with a rare array of five soil types, and these soil differences from block to block have always been notable in the wines they deliver.  

The geographical map pictured below provides a visual explanation as to why Margarita Vineyard is such a ground zero for soil diversity. 

We have cropped the map to show the location of Margarita Vineyard, and all of the black lines you see are fault lines. This abundance of localized faults has churned and turned the terrain over time, which explains why you can see everything from uplifted fossilized sea beds, thick fields of shale, rocky plains of alluvium and more during a short walk through the vineyard. 

Why does soil diversity matter to us? Well, it allows us to build natural complexity into a single estate-grown wine. For winemakers Mike Sinor and Stewart Cameron, it’s like giving them more colors to paint with. 

Starting with the 2013 vintage, we are taking our interest in soil influence to the next level by conducting a more controlled trial of Cabernet Sauvignon lots grown in calcareous ancient sea bed, diablo series clay and Monterey shale. Each lot was farmed the same in terms of crop load and irrigation; harvested at similar ripeness; went through the same fermentation protocols; and was racked to the same barrels (once-used Taransaud barrels with medium+ toast levels).  

In the above video, Stewart provides an update on these lots four months after harvest. And so far, the differences are pretty striking. 

The ancient sea bed lot from Block 15 is showing a deep, dense black fruit character. The diablo series clay lot from the bottom of Block 50 is exhibiting a zingy red fruit quality, while the Monterey shale lot from the top of Block 50 is showing plum and boysenberry with assertive tannins.

Stay tuned, as we will be following these wines to see how they mature from ground to glass, and looking into ways to share the results at special tastings down the line. 

Ancient Peaks
 
February 14, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

The Charm of Terroir

The French concept of “terroir” is something that goes to the heart of Ancient Peaks wines. 

In simple terms, terroir signifies the influence of “place” on a given wine, namely the soil, topography and weather. 

Now, any time you talk about terroir, it comes at the risk of sounding high-minded or pretentious. But that’s not our intent here. Our intent is to simply understand and embrace how a sense of place makes different wines distinguishable and ultimately more enjoyable. 

We believe that our estate Margarita Vineyard is the epitome of terroir. It stands alone as the southernmost vineyard in the Paso Robles region, with its own distinct microclimate and a rare array of five soil types. 

These singular interconnected conditions, in turn, have a direct influence on the fruit and the character of the resulting wines. 

It’s also worth noting that “place” is not exclusive of “people.” There is a cultural aspect to terroir. Functional vines don’t grow without supervision, and wine can’t be made without guidance from the human hand—a subject that Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor and Winemaker Stewart Cameron discuss in the accompanying video.

Terroir is what separates wine from a mere recipe or formulaic commodity. In that sense, you could say that terroir is what makes wine fun and interesting. And there’s nothing pretentious about that. 

P.S. Come out for one of our Paso Robles winery tours to get a hands-on taste of Margarita Vineyard’s terroir. 

Ancient Peaks
 
January 31, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Pruning: The 2014 Vintage Starts Now

While the vines are bare and the autumn grape harvest is still eight months  away, we are already taking action in the vineyard to maximize the caliber of the fruit to come—starting with pruning.
 
As our Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor says, “The 2014 vintage starts right now with pruning season. The wines of 2014 are already being shaped by things we are doing in the vineyard—long before the grapes have even started growing.”

Our estate Margarita Vineyard is planted to a VSP (for vertical shoot position) trellis system. With this system, the main part of the vine is shaped like a “T,” with the vine branches trained upward with catchwires. The vines in a VSP system consist of four key parts: the trunk, the arms (called cordons), the spurs (the large knobs on the cordons) and the canes (the branches).
 
We prune for quality over quantity, so we select one cane per spur and cut it back so that just two buds remain. The buds will open up during “bud break” in early spring. From the buds grow new canes and, ultimately, the grape clusters.  

Pruning sets the stage for the upcoming growing season. With pruning, you directly control your grape yields, which in turn impacts fruit balance and intensity. Pruning decisions also affect the amount of sunlight and airflow that will penetrate the fruiting zone of the vine. Diffused sunlight aids with grape ripening, while healthy airflow keeps mildew in check.

Smart pruning requires training and commitment. The vineyard crew must move quickly, making split-second decisions on where to best make their cuts. 

“When deciding where to cut, you have to think of where you want the clusters to sit on the vine,” says Vineyard Manager Jaime Muniz. “You want to separate the clusters as much as you can to get that airflow and sunlight, and to deliver the best quality to the winery.”

And so begins the vintage to come...

 

Ancient Peaks
 
January 27, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

A Taste of "Moon Dust"


Our Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor likes to call it “moon dust,” but it actually comes from the ocean, not outer space…

Of course, we are talking about the uplifted ancient sea bed at our estate Margarita Vineyard, along a block that we call Oyster Ridge. 

Here, massive white oyster fossils—some as large as footballs—are literally spilling out of the ground, embedded in fine pale calcareous soil that looks like, well, moon dust.

Considering that Margarita Vineyard is tucked into the Santa Lucia Mountains at the top of the towering Cuesta Grade above San Luis Obispo, the sight of old sea creatures here is rather astonishing. So, how did they get here?

Well, the vineyard is tucked between two local seismic faults, and it is located only about 45 miles from the massive San Andreas fault. Over thousands of years, tectonic grinding and localized earthquakes have turned the old inland sea into today’s dry ground. 

Still, you rarely see an ancient sea bed exposed along the surface like you do at Margarita Vineyard. We just happen to be located in a very geologically active spot, which explains why the vineyard spans a rare array of five soil types.

But the bottom-line question is: What does all of this mean to the wine?

For starters, Calcium-rich soil is coveted by winemakers worldwide. And considering that Wine & Spirits Magazine called Oyster Ridge “perhaps the most dramatically calcareous chunk of earth in the entire state,” that is saying a lot. 

“Oyster Ridge is planted predominantly to Bordeaux varietals,” Mike says. “The fruit from this soil displays pretty aromatics, with high-toned flavors and really fine tannins. The Cabernet from this spot is different from the Cabernet on other parts of the ranch.”
He adds, “At the end of the day, it gives us another color to paint with, and to create an estate Cabernet blend with balance and complexity.”