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The DIRT on AP - a winery blog

Ancient Peaks
 
December 22, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

A Wine Not Made

Sometimes you’re defined not just by the wines you make, but by the wines you don’t.

A case in point is our 2011 Petit Verdot, or more specifically, what might have been our 2011 Petit Verdot.

Petit Verdot has been a mainstay of our White Label reserve series for many years, along with Malbec, Petite Sirah and the Oyster Ridge red blend. But in 2011, the Petit Verdot just didn’t measure up to our White Label standards, so we didn’t bottle it.

“Petit Verdot is always the last grape to ripen at Margarita Vineyard,” says Mike Sinor, our director of winemaking. “We had a cool year in 2011, and the Petit Verdot fruit just never developed the intensity we were looking for at the White Label level. It was close, but in the end, we decided not to bottle it.”

He adds, “It was hard. That wine has a fan base, and we were walking away from revenue. But one reason it has that fan base is because of the White Label standard of quality that we’ve set.”

Such decisions are part of a larger culture here at Ancient Peaks, where ownership and staff routinely taste our wines together and push each other for honest feedback (one such tasting pictured above!). As Mike says, “You can get so caught up in cutting wood that you forget to sharpen your saw. It’s easy to lose sight of that when things get busy, but we’ve made it a priority here to set aside time for gut-checking ourselves.”

We also conduct comparative tastings of different varietals and wine regions from the U.S. and beyond. “It’s easy to develop what we call a ‘house palate,’ where you become too focused on your own wines,” Mike says. “It’s critical to have more of a global view of wine, and to understand where you fit into it.”

So there you have it—the true story behind a wine that we didn’t make.  

Ancient Peaks
 
December 9, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Winter in Wine Country

As the famous holiday song goes, “It’s the most wonderful time of the year…”—and it certainly looks that way at our estate Margarita Vineyard right now!

The accompanying photos were taken yesterday amid sunny skies and mild temperatures that nevertheless managed to exude a wintry ambiance. 

Recent rains have generated a fresh carpet of lush green grass along the vine rows, providing a colorful complement to the fiery seasonal hues of the remaining vineyard leaves. The result is a quintessential holiday season scene in the Paso Robles wine country.

We invite you to come out and enjoy it yourself during one of our guided vineyard and food pairing tours offered every Saturday.  

Photo below credit LiLi Tan, KSBY:

Ancient Peaks
 
December 3, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Join Us for Holiday Fun

We invite you to take a break from the stress of the season and get into the holiday spirit with us as we host three timely events over the next week:

Thursday, December 4 – Essential Holiday Wine & Cheese Plate

Get a jump on your holiday hosting and learn how Ancient Peaks wines can be highlighted with fine cheeses from around the world. The experts from Fromagerie Sophie will show you how to create the essential wine and cheese plate for all your entertaining needs. Featured wines will be tasted with selected cheeses, additional wine available for purchase by the glass or bottle. Just $15 per person, click here for RSVP info.

Saturday, December 6 – Holiday Open House

A winter classic is back as we host our annual Holiday Open House with complimentary Reserve tastings, festive nibbles and a Toys for Tots charity drive. Along the way, ask us about our wine club as the perfect gift for your wine-loving friends and relatives. We will include shipping on the first shipment as a special promotion this December. The open house runs from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and no RSVP is necessary, just pop in!

Wednesday, December 10 – Holiday Cork Art & Craft

We have asked one of the craftiest gals we know, Zoe, to share her tricks for turning corks into art and fun tips for sprucing up your gifts and more! A glass of wine and light bites will be included. Specials on select wines will be offered during the event, and additional glasses will be available for purchase. Just $15 per person, click here for RSVP info.

We look forward to celebrating with you!

Ancient Peaks
 
November 21, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

"Painting" the 2012 Zinfandel

We often talk about the diverse soils and complex geography of our estate Margarita Vineyard, which spans a variety of different slopes, aspects and elevations. 

If you’re inclined to ask, “Why does it matter?”, we’ll forgive you—and then pour you a glass of our 2012 Zinfandel, which is a perfect example of why it matters.

As Director of Winemaking Mike Sinor explains in the short video above, the 2012 Zinfandel is a blend of three separate blocks grown in three distinct soil types at Margarita Vineyard.

Fruit from the volcanic soils of Block 32 brings a core of varietal spiciness to the wine, while a contribution from the shale soils of Block 49 adds a layer of dark, ripe fruit. Lastly, the cooler climes and alluvial soils of Block 39 bring enhanced structure and backbone.  

The nuance doesn’t end there. As Mike explains, he and Winemaker Stewart Cameron target specific subsections, which you might call “blocks within blocks.” So from Block 32, they choose fruit from the middle of the block, which they call the tenderloin. In Block 49, they focus on the elevated crown of the block. In other words, a slight change in aspect or elevation can be the difference between good and great.

The result is that Mike and Stewart have what they call “different colors to paint with” when assembling the final blend. It allows them to craft an estate-grown wine that naturally exhibits fullness and complexity, qualities that you can taste in our 2012 Zinfandel. 

Ancient Peaks
 
November 11, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Superhero Soars over Ancient Peaks

You could say that a superhero flew over our estate Margarita Vineyard yesterday…

Indeed, Stephen Amell, star of the hit superhero show Arrow on the CW network, came out to Santa Margarita Ranch on Sunday for a zipline tour with our affiliated Margarita Adventures, followed by a tasting of our wines. 

Stephen and his friend Andrew Harding were in the Paso Robles wine country working on a new pilot show project focusing on the wine experience. Stephen and Andrew are also partners in their own wine label, Nocking Point Wines.

After they zipped over our Pinot Noir block on the Pinot Express zipline, Ancient Peaks co-owner Karl Wittstrom treated them to a tasting of Ancient Peaks wines. Pictured above are (left to right) Andrew, Karl and Stephen enjoying our 2012 Renegade red blend. 

Thanks to Stephen, Andrew, producer Alan Miller and his crew for turning their spotlight on the Paso Robles wine country. The pilot show featuring Margarita Adventures and Ancient Peaks Winery is set to air this winter, stay tuned for details.

Ancient Peaks
 
November 6, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Introducing Santa Margarita Ranch AVA

We earlier shared the news about the establishment of the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA as one of 11 new sub-appellations of the umbrella Paso Robles AVA.

Now we're going to dig a little deeper into the distinguishing characteristics of the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA, including the rare diversity of soil types pictured below. 

The Santa Margarita Ranch AVA is situated along the foot of the coastal Santa Lucia Mountain Range, roughly 25 miles southeast of the city of Paso Robles and just 14 miles from the Pacific Ocean to the west. Our estate Margarita Vineyard now enjoys the rare distinction of being the only vineyard located within its own namesake AVA

Below are highlights of the growing conditions found in the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA. All quotes are from the adopted Santa Margarita Ranch AVA petition:

  • The Santa Margarita Ranch viticultural area “is distinctive from that of other areas of the Paso Robles AVA, in terms of topography, geology, geological history, soils, and climate.”
     
  • Santa Margarita Ranch is one of the coolest sub-appellations within the Paso Robles AVA, making it “very much a true, cool Region II climate.” The maritime influence increases “to the west towards the Pacific Ocean and below specific topographic gaps in the range.”
     
  • Santa Margarita Ranch is also marked by an unusual diversity of soils, due largely to an array of active fault lines along the coastal ridge: “The surficial geology here is also different than in other parts of the Paso Robles AVA…with an extensive area of the Miocene age Santa Margarita marine sandstone interfacing with the Monterey shales, granitic rocks to the east, and ‘slices’ (due to faulting) of the older Cretaceous marine sedimentary rocks and conglomerates to the west.”
     
  • Of the 11 sub-appellations within the Paso Robles AVA, Santa Margarita Ranch receives among the highest amount of rainfall—29 inches per year on average “as Pacific storms dump their water across the steep, high mountain ridge.”

These distinctive growing conditions impart a pronounced sense of place in our wines. Paso Robles is our home, and we will always lead with the Paso Robles message on our labels and elsewhere. But the establishment of the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA allows us to drill down more clearly into what makes our location distinctive, and why it matters to our wines. 

Time Posted: Nov 6, 2014 at 11:59 AM
Ancient Peaks
 
October 30, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Tricks for Charitable Treats

We are blessed to reside in in the Paso Robles wine country, which is composed of small-town communities such as Paso Robles, Templeton, Atascadero and our hometown of Santa Margarita.

Neighborliness is alive and well in these parts, and we feel very supported by our local customers and wine club members, not to mention our peers in the wine industry. For this reason, we join many other local wineries in striving to help make San Luis Obispo County an even better place.

One of our latest ventures is a Halloween pumpkin drive. We stocked a small pumpkin “patch” at our tasting room, and all proceeds from the pumpkin sales go to the Santa Margarita Elementary School PTA.

“Parents come in for wine tasting, and the kids get to walk out with a pumpkin,” says Nina Leschinsky, our direct to consumer sales manager. “It’s been a lot of fun.”

When it comes to charitable efforts, we place an emphasis on causes that align with our own winery culture, including those that benefit agriculture, sustainability, education, land stewardship and historical appreciation.

Accordingly, we have also provided donations and support to Santa Margarita Beautiful, a local beautification nonprofit, as well as the Paso Robles High School girls’ basketball team and California Women for Agriculture, among others. 

“Often times it’s our own employees or wine club members who ask for support for something near and dear to them,” Nina says. “My son attends Santa Margarita Elementary, and I appreciate how our winery ownership is supporting the local school. There are some big hearts here.”

Ancient Peaks
 
October 28, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

Rooted in Royalty

One little-known fact about our estate Margarita Vineyard is that was planted by the Robert Mondavi family, who are rightfully considered California wine royalty.

Robert Mondavi (pictured above) was a visionary who recognized Napa Valley’s potential early on, and he and his family brought a similar vision to Santa Margarita Ranch many years later.

The story begins in 1999, when, after extensive site research, the Mondavis leased a section of the ranch to plant what would become known as Margarita Vineyard (originally called Cuesta Ridge Vineyard). This was virgin territory for viticulture—other than the mission grapes planted here by the padres in the late 1700s—and there were no neighboring vineyards. But the Mondavis saw something special here, and they went all in. In fact, they actually tried to acquire the ranch outright, but settled for a lease.

At the time, some viewed the ranch as an impractical place to grow the types of grape varieties for which the Paso Robles region is known, including Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel. The ranch occupies one of Paso Robles’ coolest growing environments, and it can be difficult to ripen these varietals in cooler years. But the Mondavis knew that with attentive viticulture, the ranch’s late, long growing season would translate to rich flavors with uncommon structure and balance. They also saw the diverse soils and contoured land, and knew that these things would translate to complexity in the field.

The Mondavis also blazed a sustainability trail here on the ranch. At the time, one observer said the Mondavi’s progressive practices put Margarita Vineyard “at the vanguard of sustainable agriculture in the region if not the state.”

By 2005, however, the Robert Mondavi company was under new ownership, which didn’t fully understand what the Mondavis had seen in this land.  As the owners of the ranch, were able to buy back the original lease and take full control of the vineyard. Ironically (and fatefully!), the potential of Margarita Vineyard was just beginning to be realized, and it inspired us to start making estate-grown wine under the Ancient Peaks label beginning in 2005.

We are fortunate to be the inheritors of the Mondavi family’s vision, which can today be tasted in the wines of Ancient Peaks, and which is reflected in our continued commitment to sustainable winegrowing. 

Ancient Peaks
 
October 15, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

A Singular AVA

Big news is breaking here in the Paso Robles wine country, and it’s really big news for Ancient Peaks Winery.

Last week, the U.S. Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) issued a final ruling creating 11 new American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) within the Paso Robles region: Adelaida District, Creston District, El Pomar District, Paso Robles Estrella District, Paso Robles Geneseo District, Paso Robles Highlands District, Paso Robles Willow Creek District, San Juan Creek, San Miguel District, Templeton Gap District…and Santa Margarita Ranch.

Of course, the last one, Santa Margarita Ranch, is home to our estate Margarita Vineyard—which now becomes by far the most predominant vineyard within the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA boundaries.  

We’ve long talked about the uniqueness of Margarita Vineyard as the southernmost vineyard in the Paso Robles region, standing alone and apart just 14 miles from the Pacific Ocean. This new recognition of Santa Margarita Ranch as its own distinct AVA confirms what we’ve been saying all along, and we’re very excited about it. 

In the words of the TTB, an AVA designation “allows vintners and consumers to attribute a given quality, reputation, or other characteristic of a wine made from grapes grown in an area to its geographic origin.” AVA designations are not taken lightly. They must be petitioned, and their unique growing conditions must be proven. 

As the Santa Margarita Ranch AVA petition stated, “The Santa Margarita ‘valley’ has a distinctive maritime and mountain-valley climate within the large Paso Robles AVA, different than the other proposed viticultural areas… The region is very much a true, cool Region II climate.”

We will be drilling deeper into this topic and the special attributes of the new Santa Margarita Ranch AVA. Stay tuned…  

Ancient Peaks
 
September 30, 2014 | Ancient Peaks

The Magic of Maceration

The harvest is well underway at our estate Margarita Vineyard and the crush is on at our winery, which means that several of the 2014 vintage wines are now happily fermenting away.

But while fermentation is the most obvious and celebrated part of the crush, there’s something else important taking place right now: maceration.

Maceration signifies the leaching of “phenolic” materials—such as tannin, color and flavor compounds—into the new wine by way of the skins, seed and (sometimes) stems. In other words, maceration is vital to developing the color, flavor and tannin structure of any given red wine.

Since red wines are fermented with grape skins and seeds, the maceration process takes place naturally as the fermentation progress and the grape matter breaks down (see above photo of mid-fermentation wine). However, maceration must be managed and manipulated in order to make great wine.

Here’s how we manage maceration at Ancient Peaks:

Cold Soaking: This is the act of soaking the “must” (the juicy crushed grape mass) prior to fermentation, typically for 24 to 48 hours. “Once fermentation starts, the presence of alcohol tends to extract more seed tannins, which are harsher,” says Winemaker Stewart Cameron. “When we cold soak, we’re mainly getting flavor and color extraction. So cold soaking allows us to create a more extracted wine without the tannin levels getting too astringent.”

Punchdowns/Pumpovers: As fermentation proceeds, the grape matter tends to float to the top of the bin or tank. By punching the mass down into the wine, or pumping the wine over the top of the mass, you make sure that everything remains mixed during fermentation. “There has to be contact between the skins and the wine in order for these compounds to be extracted into the solution,” Stewart says. “It’s something you have to manage throughout fermentation.”

Extended Maceration: This is the act of leaving the wine on the skins after fermentation for a period of time, to develop further extraction. However, we don’t employ extended maceration at Ancient Peaks. As Stewart explains, “We typically have enough tannin in our Margarita Vineyard fruit naturally, where I don’t think a short-term extended maceration would help. If our tannins and phenolics were light, then it might be something we’d consider.”

So there you have it, the lowdown on maceration, the unsung hero of red wine creation.